Summer Reading

English Department
Summer Reading 2020-2021
Grades 9 and 10 College Prep and Support classes will not have summer reading. 

Grade 11 will have summer reading, as the play will be used for their junior year research paper.

Grade 12 College Prep will not have summer reading but will write a college application essay.

Guidelines: You must have a physical (non-electronic copy) of your book and it must be an unused, new copy.

The purpose of reading the book is:

  • To enjoy exposure to a novel that will inspire you.

  • To encourage your understanding and love of Christian values.

  • To explore literature together and to learn more about each other through the process.

  • To expand your insights into the human situation and increase your awareness of the world.

Upon your return to classes in August:

Grades 9-11 Honors/AP & Grade 11CP  

  1. Please bring a copy of your annotated novel/novels  (see notes on pages 3 & 4 for  basic annotation guidelines) to class on the first day for immediate sharing and discussion.

  • Expect, based on the book, a writing assignment, class activities, and a creative project to be assigned the beginning week of school.

Grade 12

  1. AP LIT: Please bring a copy of your annotated novel/novels  (see notes on pages 3 & 4 for  basic annotation guidelines) to class on the first day for immediate sharing and discussion.

  • Expect, based on the book, a writing assignment, class activities, and a creative project to be assigned the beginning week of school.

  1. CP & AP Lit: You must write a rough draft of your college application essay and have it with you the day you return to class in August. 

    Guidelines for the Senior Writing Project/ College Essay are available HERE.

Download PDF of Senior Summer Writing Project/ College Essay Guidelines 

Download PDF of Senior Summer Writing Project/ College Essay Rubric

We look forward to seeing you in August!
The Resurrection College Prep High School English Department

Enjoy your Summer Reading!

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SUMMER READING SELECTIONS 

Grade

College Prep with Support

College Prep


College Prep Honors/AP

 

9

 (11291)

 No summer reading

 


 (11691)

 No summer reading


 
 

 (11891)

 The Book Thief
 by Zusak

 

10

 

 (12291)

 No summer reading

 

 (12691)

 No summer reading

 

 (12891)

 Great Expectations
 by Dickens


 

11 

 

 (14691)

 A Raisin in the Sun
 by Hansberry

 

 (14891)

 Ethan Frome
 by Wharton

 and

 Between the World and Me
 by Coates



 

12

 

 (All CP courses)
 No summer reading

 but

 College application   essay rough draft due   on first day of school:   follow these directions

 
 (18991)
 Things Fall Apart
 by Achebe

 and

 How to Read Literature   Like a Professor (2014)
 by Foster

 and

 College application essay   rough draft due on first   day of school: follow   these directions

       

TIPS ON ACTIVE READING  (ANNOTATING)

Reading closely and actively will help you to better understand the texts you encounter.  You will use this skill throughout your life to make sense of what you read.  Good readers (at all levels) use these strategies.

The goal is to form the habit of using a consistent marking system that is easy for you to remember.  Here are some tips:

1. Underline or highlight any VOCABULARY words you do not know.  Look up these words and write the definition in the margin. Ask questions about vocabulary in class, and we will define them together.

2. Note CHARACTER DESCRIPTIONS as you are reading.  Each time a new character is introduced, CIRCLE his/her name, and then underline descriptions of those characters.  It is important to get to know the “people” you are reading about.

3. Analyze TITLES while you read.  Try to predict why the author named a novel what he/she did.  At the end of the novel, go back and try to determine the reason for the choice of title.  Make your predictions about the title right next to the title on the title page, and then write your concluding notes right below your predictions.

5. Look for PASSAGES that are CONFUSING to you.  Put a QUESTION MARK in the margin, and ask about the passage in class.  Also, in the margin, try to paraphrase (put in your own words) what you think the meaning is, to the best of your ability.

6. Highlight or underline and then STAR passages that relate to a MAIN IDEA or THEME of the book.  The star will help you to remember that the passages relate the main focus of the text.  Also, write a word or two in the margin to summarize the point.

7. When something strikes you personally (when you can relate to something, when you are shocked by something, when something makes you sad, happy, angry, etc.), put an EXCLAMATION MARK in the margin.  Next to the exclamation mark, jot down PERSONAL COMMENTS and REACTIONS.

8. Put PARENTHESES around QUOTES that seem important to you or that you particularly like, and then put QUOTATION MARKS (“”) in the margin.  If you do not understand these quotes, put a question mark, and ask about it in class.  Your teacher may ask you to share quotes you liked in class.

9. Put BRACKETS around RECURRING IMAGES and SYMBOLS within the text.  Why do you think these images are repeated?  Why are they important to your comprehension of the text?  Try to jot down a word or two regarding the meaning in the margin.

10. Highlight or underline and put an ARROW in the margin when you encounter KEY TURNING POINTS in the PLOT.  What has changed?  Why have these things changed?  In what direction will the plot go from there?  Try to make PREDICTIONS about what will happen later on in the book as you read.  Jot down some questions that you think still need answering.  How do you think these questions will be answered?

 

Download PDF of Summer Reading Assignments